Author Archives: pilgrim

About pilgrim

Hi, Pilgrim here... just hoping to echo the Good News to all that visit here!

Reading Good Sermons

Reading Good Sermons

The reading of good sermons is the most underrated kind of Christian literature on the market today. In former centuries, the reading of sermons was the bulk of the mature Christian’s reading diet.

Most Puritan books, for example, are sermons edited for print. Sermon reading keeps believers in the Word, matures the soul, and whets the appetite for good preaching. It promotes Christ-centered thinking, healthy self-examination, and godly piety in every sphere of life.

Though nothing can replace the Word preached, sermon reading has one advantage over preaching—the sermons that made it into print are usually the minister’s best!

Tolle Lege—”pick up and read” great sermon books, especially those of past centuries that are packed with spiritual meat.” — Joel Beeke

Joel Beeke is president and professor of systematic theology and homiletics at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary

The Pilgrim’s Longings

The Pilgrim’s Longings
Delivered by
C. H. SPURGEON,
At the Metropolitan Tabernacle, Newington

And truly, if they had been mindful of that country from whence they came out, they might have had opportunity to have returned. But now they desire a better country, that is, an heavenly: wherefore God is not ashamed to be called their God: for he hath prepared for them a city.”
Hebrews 11:15-16.

BRAHAM left his country at God’s command, and he never went back again. The proof of faith lies in perseverance. There is a sort of faith which does run well, but it is soon hindered, and it doth not obey the truth. That is not the faith to which the promise is given.

The faith of God’s elect continues and abides. Being connected with the living and incorruptible seed, it lives and abides for ever. Abraham returned not; Isaac returned not; Jacob returned not. The promise was to them as “strangers and sojourners,” and so they continued.

The apostle tells us, however, that they were not forced so to continue; they did not remain because they could not return. Had they been mindful of the place from whence they came out, they might have found opportunities to go back. Continue reading

The Shadow of the Almighty

The Shadow of the Almighty
Newman Hall

“He that dwells in the secret place of the Most High, shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty.” – Psalm 91:1.

The desert is dreary. The way is long. Heavily burdened, a weary traveler slowly drags onward his wounded feet. Faint by reason of the fiery blaze which smites him from the unclouded sky and the scorching sand, he eagerly looks around for shelter. He pants for even the muddiest pool where he may quench his raging thirst. In such “a weary land,” how welcome “the shadow of a great rock,” and the clear, cool fountain gushing up within its rugged clefts! But where can such a refuge be found for the soul—weary with wandering, crushed by care, groaning under guilt? Where can its burden be taken off, its sorrows soothed, its mighty thirst assuaged?

A trembling fugitive, long the victim of robbery and violence, has vainly run here and there in quest of a hiding-place from his cruel enemies, who, with threatening gestures and words of hate, are in full pursuit. Now he hears their voices clamoring for his blood, as they press more closely upon his track. Each moment he expects the fatal shot. How joyful, as it suddenly bursts upon him, is the sight of the friendly fortress whose open portal bids him enter, and then shuts impregnably! Beneath the shadow of those strong towers, he may now rest both from his toils and his terrors!

But where for me, pursued by my relentless enemy, the devil, entangled by doubts, haunted by fears, with many a barbed and poisoned arrow rankling in my conscience—where for me is the privileged retreat which no hostile foot may enter, where all my wounds may be healed, and where, taking up my abode, I may be henceforth both safe and happy? Continue reading

Election Unto Holiness

Election Unto Holiness
Charles Spurgeon

God neither chose them nor called them because they were holy, but He called them that they might be holy, and holiness is the beauty produced by His workmanship in them.

Grace does not choose a man and leave him as he is.

There is no man in this world chosen to go to heaven apart from being made fit to go there.

Foreordination to holiness is indissolubly joined to foreordination to happiness.

God’s choice of us was not because we were holy, but to make us holy; and God’s purpose will not be fulfilled unless we are made holy.

Charles Spurgeon

Purgatory is an Impossibility

Purgatory is an Impossibility
Charles Spurgeon

Be not deceived about it, you are either on the way to heaven or on the road to hell. There is no purgatory or middle condition…

Purgatory is an impossibility, if full assurance be possible.

For what does Rome offer when you have done all? Purgatory and its pains! It tells you that when you have done all, you may have to lie for hundreds of years in a place of misery till you have been purged from sin.

Be not deceived about it, you are either on the way to heaven or on the road to hell. There is no purgatory or middle condition in the next world Purgatory is an invention of the Pope for the filling of his cellar and his larder; and no more profitable speculation has ever been set agoing than the saying of masses and the robbing of dupes, under the pretence of altering that state which is fixed for ever.

Purgatory Pickpurse was the name the first reformers gave it. You will go to heaven or to hell, and you will remain in one place or the other; for you have either a character that is fit for heaven or a character that is fit for hell, and there is no character which can be supposed, if we understand the Scriptures aright, which would be fit for a middle place, neither is there any middle place prepared for it.

I have no authentic communication by which to describe purgatory, but by Romish report it is a terrible place; now, if true believers go there, then God either does remember their sins, which he says he will not do; or else he punishes them for sins which he does not recollect.

Charles Spurgeon

Jealousy

Jealousy
Charles Spurgeon

You cannot commit a greater crime against some people than to be more useful than they are.

When we meet a brother with ten talents, do we congratulate ourselves on having such a man given to help us, or do we depreciate him as much as we can? Such is the depravity of our nature that we do not readily rejoice in the progress of others if they leave us behind; but we must school ourselves to this.

Charles Spurgeon

Deny God’s Sovereignty?

Deny God’s Sovereignty?
Charles Spurgeon

“Answer me, ye that deny God’s sovereignty, and hate his election…”

However much this may be disputed, as it frequently is, you must first deny the authenticity and full inspiration of the Holy Scripture before you can legitimately and truly deny it.

I believe the man who is not willing to submit to the electing love and sovereign grace of God, has great reason to question whether he is a Christian at all, for the spirit that kicks against that is the spirit of the devil, and the spirit of the unhumbled, unrenewed heart.

Answer me, ye that deny God’s sovereignty, and hate his election—how is it that angels are condemned to everlasting fire, while to you, the children of Adam, the gospel of Christ is freely preached? The only answer that can possible be given is this: God wills to do it.

Our Arminian antagonists always leave the fallen angels out of the question: for it is not convenient to them to recollect this ancient instance of Election. They call it unjust, that God should choose one man and not another. By what reasoning can this be unjust when they will admit that it was righteous enough in God to choose one race—the race of men, and leave another race—the race of angels, to be sunk into misery on account of sin.

To this day, men cannot bear that doctrine. Free will suits them very well, but free grace does not. They would not let Christ choose his own wife; I say it with the utmost reverence.

Charles Spurgeon